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Council candidate Q&A - Aleshire

May 11, 2001

Council candidate Q&A - Aleshire



* Democratic council candidate


Kristin B. Aleshire, 25, 745 Guilford Ave., planner for the towns of Middletown and Myersville in Frederick County, Md.

Q: What are your qualifications to serve as a City Council member?


A: I believe that my academic background, professional experience, and sincere enthusiasm about the community grant me the necessary ability to best serve the interests of all of the residents of this city. Furthermore, my understanding of the entire municipal process and the social dynamics of this community will only continue to grow, enhancing my ability to serve everyone with a vested interest in this community, well into the future. I also believe that I understand and appreciate the unique qualities of this City, and the importance of ensuring that they remain for those who have yet to experience them.

Q: Is there a crime problem in Hagerstown? If so, what is it and what should be done to address it?


A: I believe that there is a crime problem in various areas of every community, brought about by ignoring the changing relationship of the physical and social characteristics that develop in these areas. To address this change, a conscious effort must be made by the entire community to promote an atmosphere that firmly does not welcome those who would choose to infiltrate this City with negative social characteristics. If we increase and enforce the visibility of the positive attributes exhibited by every part of our community, it may promote the idea that criminal activity will not be tolerated in this City.

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Q: Should the city be involved in assisting with homeownership? Why or why not, and if so, how?


A: The availability of increased state grant related funding programs offer the opportunity for Hagerstown to provide various types of assistance in promoting greater homeownership within the community. I believe that this program will only benefit the City as we continue to struggle with a rental verses owner occupied balance that appears to be opposite the national average. However, I further believe that to achieve this the City should focus on providing a program for ownership rather than the role of landlord. We must keep this goal in mind by pushing for quality residential development as we continue to expand.

Q: Should there be a referendum on city funding for a new or significantly renovated minor league baseball stadium? Why or why not?


A: There are numerous levels of funding that do not appear to be in place for this project to move forward. This includes the absence of private funding sources, lack of consensus support from the County, non-inclusion in the State budget, and inability for the City to afford such increase in debt service. Given these circumstances, a referendum would appear to be moot at this point. However, with the current direction of State funds going into existing facilities, this project may fare a better chance of receiving State funding support for rehabilitation of the current stadium, rather than reconstruction elsewhere.

Q: How will you ensure that city services - such as police and fire protection - will continue at a reasonable rate to taxpayers?


A: Given the dynamic location of the City, and its increasing pace of development, continuing to provide an affordable level of City services must remain a top priority of the budgetary process. There are numerous factors involved in providing solutions to this matter, including establishing a community atmosphere that public sector employees would choose over surrounding areas in neighboring cities, counties, and states, as well as, ensuring the existing residential and commercial population that new development will bear the burden of expanded services in an equitable manner.

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