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Letters to the Editor 3/27

March 27, 2001

Letters to the Editor 3/27



Bush has right to reach out



To the editor:

According to an interview in the Feb. 27 issue of USA Today, Governor Glendening finds it nearly sickening to see President Bush reach out to pat the head of black children, as the president is "anathema" to most things black Americans find important.

When asked what issues, the governor said "tax cuts, privatization of Social Security, and monies to faith-based organizations." Let's look at this assertion a little closer.

All Americans who pay income taxes would like a tax cut. The cynicism among Americans - used deftly by liberals - comes from the belief, by an equally wide margin, that no tax cut will materialize. Perhaps this has something to do with the fact that a middle-class tax cut was promised by former President Clinton in 1992, and instead we experienced the largest tax increase in history. Of course, many Americans do not earn enough to pay income taxes, and while a payroll tax cut may be more effective, that is another issue entirely.

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On Social Security, a couple of factors are in play. First, liberals use an effective bit of verbal sleight-of-hand in framing the issue. Allowing individuals to privately invest a mere 2 percent of their Social Security withholdings in no way constitutes "privatizing" the system. By using such Chicken Little tactics, especially considering the current market condition, liberals are able to turn the argument into a caricature, and an effective one in this age of sound bite news.

Also, the fact that no one is forced into private investing is conveniently left out of the debate. In point of fact, even considering the normal ups and downs of the stock market, one is virtually guaranteed, over a period of 20-30 years, to receive a return that averages 9-10 percent. Compare that to the paltry 1-2 percent Social Security returns and - if given the cold, hard facts - most people would opt to at least place that 2 percent in a money market fund or C.D.

As to faith-based organizations receiving federal funds, this happens to be nothing new. Many charities with religious ties are listed under several umbrella organizations that receive government funding. I have yet to see any of these religious entities setting national policy, burning suspected witches or heedlessly clobbering fearful homeless people over the head with Bibles.

It is a truism that charity begins at home, and that local organizations - regardless of whether they be religious or secular - are better equipped and better able to deal with local issues than ponderous federal government programs.

Proselytizing should not be subsidized by tax monies; providing meals, clothes and warm places to seek shelter are what they are: attempts to help those in need.

So why, in light of all of this, does it bother the governor to see the president reach out to minorities? Could it be the temptation to brand conservatives as racist at every opportunity? Could it be because of fear of success? After all, black Americans voted 90 percent for Albert Gore, yet Bush is still reaching out to them. If in fact he is successful, could it be the end of the tired old racial politics that has been played since the '60's by the Democrats? The condescending, "vote for me and we'll take care of you because you need us to," brand of subtle racism is growing long in the tooth.

Here's to wishing it an early grave.

Doug Walker

Hagerstown




Birthing Center did a fine job



To the editor:

We just want to take this opportunity to thank the staff of the Family Birthing Center at Washington County Hospital. We recently had a son who needed to be hospitalized for a week following his birth due to an infection.

While we traveled back and forth to the birthing center's nursery for five days after our release to visit him, we had to leave many hours of the daily care for our newborn to the nurses at the birthing center. Every person who played a part in our situation was very professional, courteous and extremely sensitive to how difficult this was for us. Although we were very concerned for our son and found it difficult to be home without him, we received much comfort from knowing he was in such wonderful hands.

We also want to thank Dr. Jai Nahar for his professional care in evaluating our son. He put himself in our shoes and made decisions from a doctor's standpoint but with a parent's heart. In addition, we would like to thank Dr. David Solberg and Dr. Andrew Oh for their excellent care during our pregnancy. A special appreciation goes to Dr. Solberg who helped to bring this special miracle into our lives.

Darryl and Brenda Brown

Smithsburg




The cure for pain



To the editor:

Everyone becomes a victim of pain. We hurt physically, emotionally and spiritually. Sleep will not come as we feel our pain and those of others. Our pain is pain and not the result of our sin. God is not so small as to stick us when we make a mistake. He is here to releive it and take it away.

As we wipe away our tears, a bruised hand is reaching up to a heavenly face and wiping away his tears. Our struggles can cause us to wallow in self pity or we can defeat them by allowing God to help us grow and learn and become more able to reach out to others.

Pain can also come from those who dislike us and put us down and say unkind things about us. These hurts are slow to heal, but we must not let them turn into hate. God has given us the cure - forgiveness. Each time we forgive some one we are closer to him. It frees our soul and we continue to follow his rules. In doing things his way we find peace.

Frances Moats

Hagerstown

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