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letters 2/8

February 08, 2001

Letters to the Editor 2/8



Bush tax plan panders to bankers



To the editor:

Of course Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan would endorse President Bush's $1.6 trillion tax plan. The last thing he and his colleagues in the banking industry want to see happen is for the U.S. to pay down the national debt. Once it's eliminated, bankers stand to lose trillions in interest. Banks don't want to lose their best customer - the American taxpayer.

President Bush's school voucher program is a lousy, costly idea. It'd be better if they spent money to teach parents to be good, caring people rather than cut funding for public schools.

American kids don't need more military training and money to make war. They need more money to learn and to make peace. And that means better teachers, better pay and more money to our public schools. Government should not follow Sparta, a militaristic, warring state within the Greek civilization.

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Is it only coincidental that the California blackout and energy crisis coincides with President Bush's energy legislation, which calls for fast-track drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? The White House bill will be introduced early in February. The bill's purpose is to lessen America's dependence on foreign oil and to create a national energy policy to prevent shortages that have led to the California crisis. It looks like Bush and his team will get what they want by hook or by crook.

If the Bush team's cataloged of pranks, vandalism and stolen White House property by President Clinton and his people is true, then President Bush's early dismissal of these slanderous allegations and statements should be reviewed and investigated by federal authorities. What are they afraid will be found out? Maybe they don't want to go that far because it's just political hogwash. After all, didn't Bush win the election? Or did he?

Theodore A. Schendel

Hedgesville, W.Va.




Evil averted



To the editor:

When God saved me from my sinful ways, it was the best thing that could ever have happened to me. Sin is the death of the soul: A man dead in his sins has no desire for spiritual pleasures. A state of sin is a state of conformity to this world and also wicked men and women are slaves to Satan. This does not need to be this way, because Jesus Christ came to save us by pardoning us, that we might not die by the sentence of the law.

A regenerated sinner becomes a living soul; he lives a life of holiness, being born of God. He lives, being delivered from the quit of sin, by pardoning and justifying grace.

When you are a sinner, you roll yourself around in the dust; now, sanctified souls sit in heavenly places, and are raised above this world, by Christ's grace.

I know that some people are repulsed by the idea of eternal life because their lives are miserable. And your life is only miserable because of the choices you make. All you need to do is put your trust and confidence in him that he alone can save you. Putting him in full control of your present plans and eternal destiny, believing in both trusting his words as reliable and relying on his power to change you.

How much time do we have left? Nobody knows. Do you want to keep on taking chances in not knowing when Jesus is coming back: "Because He is coming back." Receive this new life by faith now, do not remain miserable, start looking at life in a eternal perspective. The highest price has been paid in full. Salvation is free: The choice is yours.

James Harrison Twyman Jr.

Hagerstown




Evil unchallenged



To the editor:

Tuesday, Jan. 16, Citizens Against the Race Course came to town needing support in the fight for their freedom of a safe neighborhood. It was sad to see that not one of our politicians or town leaders and just a few citizens came in support.

We hear they are concerned about our children and citizens. If so, how could they over look something like this? These people have supported the business people of a 60 mile area all their lives, and their forefathers did before them. They are sending their children into Hancock now for their education.

It seems the love of money and pleasure have overshadowed the evil of gambling and destruction of souls. It could be one of ours. We will all give account one day. Whatever we think. Good or evil.

George E. Lashley

Hancock

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