Advertisement

Cheating strips away the spirit of learning

February 05, 2001

Cheating strips away the spirit of learning



Public schools were established so all classes of youth would have the opportunity to gain the benefits that an education provides.

continued

Children held a passion for learning and a thirst for knowledge. An education served as their key to future success.

Today, though, as we commission more standardized testing and students have available such tools as the Internet, they seem to have lost the ambition to learn.

Rather, they focus on receiving high marks at any cost.

A decline in the desire to acquire knowledge is the soul of the problem.

Cheating stems from a disinterest in taught material. If students were more inspired to learn, the cheating epidemic would have found its antidote.

To begin fighting the tide of this undesired conduct, we must begin at the root of the problem - the classroom.

Advertisement

All too often I see dedicated teachers following the course syllabus, minus the spirit.

Students have no desire to learn because they see the information as neither inspirational nor imperative. I never thought any teacher could make calculus fun until taking the course my senior year. I have no desire to pursue a career in mathematics, but I do enjoy learning how to find the conic volume of a Hershey's Kiss.

Zero tolerance may reduce the number of cheaters, but we still will not have solved the soul of the problem - re-implementing a student's desire to learn. Students will find another way to slip it past the teacher, and receive that "A" on the anatomy final.

To fight this behavior with an affirmative mindset seems the best way to alter its increasing slope, and along the way instill in students that passion for learning that has been lost.

Asha Patel is a senior at North Hagerstown High School.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|