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Letters to the Editor 2/3

January 31, 2001

Letters to the Editor 2/3



Gifts were lovely



To the editor:

To the Public School Art Students of Washington County: I wanted to tell you how much the Christmas stocking meant to me. It was nice to wake up Christmas Day and find it on my dresser. The gifts were so lovely and useful.

As I spent most of my holidays alone, it was really very sweet and kind of you thinking and remembering someone like me in the hospital on Christmas. Thank you so much for all your kindness. I will cherish this in my heart. You brought much joy to a person who was hurting.

Marty Fitzgerald

Gettysburg, Pa.




Bill still bad



To the editor:

During his exodus from D.C. on Air Force One, Bill Clinton, the self-indulgent former Panderer-in-Chief, allowed the wholesale looting of all the Presidential Seal amenities and everything else that wasn't bolted down, including a case of Colgate toothpaste from under the bathroom sink.

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His staff of moral morons also ransacked and vandalized the White House offices prior to their ignominious exile.

What a fitting epitaph for these contemptuous cretins. It's more than enough to gag a maggot.

Larry D. Kump

Falling Waters, W.Va.




Sen. Ashcroft is qualified



To the editor:

Senator Ashcroft has the experience, a strong record on crime, the integrity and the educational background to become the next Attorney General of the United States.

As the first Attorney General-designate in U.S. history who has served as state attorney general, governor and U.S. Senator, Ashcroft has and will continue to enforce the law.

Leadership: As Missouri attorney general he led the National Association of Attorneys General, as governor he was chairman of the National Governors Association and chairman of the Education Commission of the States, as senator he was chairman of the Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution.

As governor, Ashcroft signed into law a measure requiring first offenders to serve a minimum of 40 percent of their prison term, second offenders must serve 60 percent, and Class X offenders (inmates who have committed three felonies) must serve 80 percent of their prison term.

As governor, Ashcroft enacted first hate crimes legislation in Missouri creating penalties for ethnic intimidation and crimes committeed for motives based on race, color, religion, or national origin. He also created penalties for institutional vandalism.

As senator, Ashcroft authored and passed comprehensive legislation to bolster the fight against the highly addictive drug methamphetamine with longer prison terms for drug criminals; $55 million in 2000 for additional resources for law enforcement, education, and prevention; and a wider ban on methamphetamine paraphernalia. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) called it a "landmark" in the fight against illegal drugs.

On Jan. 3, The Wall Street Journal called these liberal groups' destructive tactics into question. Their editorial board stated, "You have to wonder precisely what lies are coming. We are not so naive to wonder that on occasion a political party would resort to distortion and lies to win a political battle. But the Democrats seem to be making racial distortion a principle of their politics. The Ashcroft confirmation hearings may show just how far race-card politics can be pushed."

Lois Quesenberry

Hagerstown




Seminar on home schooling



To the editor:

I want to welcome everyone who has interest in home schooling to a conference, which will be held on Saturday, April 7, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Broadfording Christian Academy, 13535 Broadfording Church Road, Hagerstown. The event will be hosted by the Appalachian Regional Co-op, a group of area home schooling families.

Approximately 20 different workshops will be available on subjects including "What About Socialization," "The Home School Law," "Home Schooling Multi-Ages," "Curriculum Resources" and "Home Schooling Without a Curriculum." Home schooling parents will lead the sessions.

This will be our fourth annual conference. People who have attended in previous years included parents who were thinking about home schooling and beginners, as well as experienced home schoolers.

Those who attended told us the sessions were very helpful, as was the opportunity to talk informally with knowledgeable home educators.

For more information, call Barbara Martin at 301-739-6502.

Lydia Phillips

Hagerstown

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