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Authority receives $450,000

December 06, 2000

Authority receives $450,000



By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer, Chambersburg


WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Bear Valley Joint Authority in Franklin County, Pa., will receive $450,000 in federal money to upgrade local water facilities in the Broad Run area, U.S. Rep. Bud Shuster, R-Pa., said Tuesday in a release.

"This funding will be used to construct and upgrade a variety of local water projects along the Broad Run area," said Shuster, chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

Bob John, a manager at the authority, said he was not aware of the funding or how it would be appropriated Wednesday afternoon.

Shuster said the money will allow the Bear Valley Joint Authority to increase its self-sufficiency and efficiency by constructing a water processing facility next to its pre-existing underground water supply in the western part of the county.

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The authority supplies water to 4,000 customers for drinking and fire protection in Peters, St. Thomas and Hamilton townships.

"I truly believe that adequate wastewater infrastructure is one of our top local priorities for the western region of Franklin County," Shuster said. "I have stressed the need to build assets for our communities in south central Pennsylvania so that our area can provide the building block of a better future for our children."

Shuster said he has worked with the local community to create long-term solutions to solve water and wastewater concerns for several years.

He said projects such as this will improve the area's economic opportunities.

"While I have focused on improving our region's roads as the key to improving economic conditions in our area, I am also a firm believer that wastewater treatment improvements can be just as critical to enhancing job creation in our area," Shuster said.

The funding was secured in the VA, HUD and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act of 2001 signed into law Oct. 27.

The grant will be administered by the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

Shuster, who was elected to his 15th term last month, secured more than $14 million in federal funds in 1991 for the removal of the railroad tracks running through Chambersburg.

The last train ran through the downtown in November and the tracks will be removed this spring.

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