Advertisement

Excerpts from Sept. 24, 1862

September 15, 2000

Excerpts from Sept. 24, 1862



Here are excerpts from the Sept. 24, 1862, issue of the Herald of Freedom and Torch Light, the Hagerstown newspaper during the Civil War.




Suspension of the Herald and Torch


When the rebels approached Hagerstown we, in the company of hundreds of other Union men, sought refuge in Pennsylvania, and consequently the publication of the Herald and Torch was suspended for two weeks. It was the first time during the twenty-three years we have had control of this paper that we have failed to issue it upon the regular day of publication, and under the circumstances, we presume no subscriber will be ungenerous enough to censure us for deserting our post. We can print no paper under rebel rule, and this is our apology for printing none while that rule extended over Washington County. We have again returned to our sanctum, but being short of hands, and having passed through a week of intense anxiety and excitement, we are unable to do justice to this number of the paper. It was, indeed, with great difficulty that we managed to issue a paper at all, and we must therefore ask the forebearance of our patrons until we can get fully under way again.

Advertisement
The Destruction of Property


The beautiful district of country over which the great battle of Wednesday raged presents a melancholy picture of devastation. A number of houses and barns were destroyed, fences scattered as if a tornado had swept them away, hundreds of acres of corn trampled down and devoured, and wreck, ruin and desolation meet the eye at every turn. We have hitherto read of and contemplated the ravages of war at a distance, but alas! a large portion of our fertile county has fallen a victim to them, and we now see and feel them in all their intensity.

Vast Hospital


From Hagerstown to the Southere (sic) limits of the county wounded and dying soldiers are to be found in every neighborhood and in nearly every house. The whole region of country between Boonsboro and Sharpsburg is one vast Hospital. Houses and Barns are filled with them, and nearly the whole population is engaged in waiting on and ministering to their wants. In this town the Washington House, County Hall, and Lyceum Hall, have been appropriated to the use of the wounded, and our citizens, especially the ladies, are untiring in their efforts to relieve them.

Our Office Unharmed


The Rebels, during their brief reign in Hagerstown, contrary to our expectation and the expectation of every one else, refused to molest this office. They demanded the key, entered it, and printed some handbills, but did not injure a single type. The necessary destruction of property, during the progress of the war, is great enough in all conscience to restrain both sides from engaging in a wanton and malicious destruction of it, but this is not always done, and the accumulations of years of hard toil are often sacrificed to a mere spirit of vandalism. Although the rebels did not squelsh this paper, when they might easily have done so, it shall continue with unabated zeal to oppose their unholy cause to the bitter end.

On Friday, the President of the U. States, accompanied by Gen. McClellan, reviewed the several corps of the Army of the Potomac, beginning with General Burnside's, which is located near the Antietam, and concluding with that of Gen. Franklin, at Bakersville. It is stated that at each point the people collected in large numbers, and manifested the greatest enthusiasm towards both the President and Gen'l. McCLELLAN, and the troops everywhere cheered them most lustily. The President had previously visited and inspect Gen'l. SUMNER'S corps at Harper's Ferry. On Saturday he returned to Washington, expressing himself highly delighted with the conduct and appearance of both officers and men.

The Loyal Ladies of Hagerstown


From the commencement of the war to the present time, Hagerstown has rarely, if ever, been without more or less of the sick and wounded soldiers of the Federal Army. And we may safely say, that in no other town in the United States have those suffering defenders of the Stars and Stripes been more tenderly nursed, or more assiduously waited on and kindly cared for, than they have by the loyal ladies of this town. For fifteen months those ladies have been unremitting in their attentions to the sick and wounded soldiers, and recently, when hundreds were brought here from the battle-field of the Antietam, they had a heavy task to perform, but they met it unflinchingly, and their prompt attention and kind ministrations relieved the anguish and cheered the fainting heart of many a poor, mangled victim of this infamous rebellion. "Loyalty," the Hagerstown correspondent of the Baltimore American, expresses his approbation of their self-sacrificing labors in the following terms, in all of which we fully concur.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|