Advertisement

Letters to the Editor 7/20

July 19, 2000

Letters to the Editor 7/20



Take an ax to the duck



To the editor:

As a retired federal employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, I am deeply offended by the Mallard Fillmore cartoon appearing on your opinion page on July 14.

I do not now, nor did I then, have a pea brain. I was not lazy nor did I eat all the time. I was a federal "bureaucrat" and I am proud of my 26 years of service to the taxpayers of this country.

The time has come to remove Mallard Fillmore from your newspaper. If the reason for including it was to provide balance for the strip Doonesbury, then I will be willing to see it go in order to get rid of the mean, vicious and humorless diatribes of Mallard Fillmore.

Advertisement

Nicholas E. Bedessem

Hagerstown

East needs shops



To the editor:

We need a few good stores in the east end of Hagerstown. The Hagerstown Planning Commission seems to turn down a lot of companies that want to locate here. Why is that?

We were going to get an Outback, but they decided to go to the other end of town with everything else, when they met opposition from the planning department here.

If the problem is with traffic through Funkstown or the Edgewood intersection, why don't they locate Super Walmart out 40 East further near the exit ramp from Interstate 70?

There is all that land out there near the I-70 AutoMall. Then the traffic would mainly be coming from the interstate or local residences. It is only about two miles down the road from where they originally planned on building their store. This seems like a reasonable suggestion to me and should make everyone happy.

I wonder how many homeowners drive through Funkstown from the east end of town to get to the mall or the outlets now? Maybe if we had somewhere to go here, we wouldn't need to cut through Funkstown to do all of our shopping.

Suzanne Short

Hagerstown

Poor have little chance for life



To the editor:

People, regardless of race, profession or locale, should believe a person is innocent of a crime until a thorough investigation has been conducted to show guilt beyond a reasonable doubt - especially in the case of murder - wherein all evidence had been gathered and scrupulously examined. Then, and only then, should guilt become a factor, followed by prosecution and, if found guilty, jail time.

In Atlanta, Georgia, NFL football star, Ray Lewis, a black man, was prejudged by police, prosecutors and public alike. He was arrested and charged with murder in the death of black men.

Police botched the initial investigation. Zealous prosecutors wrongly and negligently prejudged his guilt. To salvage his reputation, freedom and livelihood, Lewis had to plead guilty to obstruction of justice, a misdemeanor, even though he was innocent of murder or any significant crime. To save face, and for the jury to return a guilty verdict, the district attorney needed Lewis' cooperation and testimony to help convict financially poor black men of murder in the ongoing, farcical trial.

In the killing fields of Texas, poor people and minorities - in particular black people - have carried the burden of guilt to their grave, often without due process or adequate council.

On national television, Gov. George W. Bush said, "They were all given a trial, found guilty and sentenced to death."

In his reasoning, there was no room for error. Later, he changed his position on guilt, but only as an afterthought to help his election.

The state of West Virginia, along with Illinois, did right to set aside death when capital crimes are on trial and the person or persons are found guilty. There's no going back once you are dead.

To date, as governor Texas, Bush has allowed the killing of 135 people. No one is perfect, including presidential hopeful George W. Bush.

Theodore A. Schendel

Hedgesville, W.Va.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|