Advertisement

Student achievement scores show improvement

July 13, 2000

Student achievement scores show improvement



By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town


MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Fluctuating student populations in the Eastern Panhandle have kept teachers scurrying, but recent Sanford Achievement Test results in Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties show students are holding their own when it comes to matching up with their peers statewide in West Virginia and across the nation.

The SAT measures a student's ability in the basic skills of reading, mathematics and language.

In the test, students are scored using a percentile range of 1 to 99. The national mean, or average, is 50.

For example, if a grade level finished in the 51st percentile, that means those students scored as well as 51 percent of the students who took the test.

The test is given to students in grades 3 through 11.

Frank Aliveto, deputy superintendent of schools in Berkeley County, said county teachers are to be praised for the improvements in the test scores. Aliveto said it is difficult to keep test scores up considering the shifts that occur in the student population.

Advertisement

There are many students who move in and out of the county school system during the course of a year, which makes it tough to deliver a consistent education, Aliveto said. The mobilization rate in some schools is up to 50 percent, meaning up to half of their students move in or out of the school during the year, Aliveto said.

In Jefferson County, school officials wanted to concentrate on bringing up math scores. Gerry Sokol, director of pupil services, reports they did just that.

Although Steve Paine, Morgan County's superintendent of schools, was pleased with increases in test scores in his county, he said he does not want to put too much emphasis on the tests. He said the tests should not be viewed as the "sole indicator" of a student's abilities.

The Morgan County Board of Education has come up with its own requirements to test student ability. One requirement is a "senior project," Paine said, that involves research and an oral report.

Looking at the actual SAT scores, In Berkeley County, third grade students scored in the 65th percentile, up from the 61st percentile recorded last year.

The remaining grades and their scores included 4th grade, 63rd percentile, up from the 62nd percentile; fifth grade, 62nd percentile, no change from last year; sixth grade, 61st percentile, down from the 62nd percentile; seventh grade, 61st percentile, down from the 63rd; eighth grade, 62nd percentile, no change; 9th grade, 59th percentile, no change; 10th grade, 59th percentile, up from the 58th and 11th grade, 61st percentile, no change.

Jefferson County's scores were: third grade, 66th percentile, up from the 64th; fourth grade, 64th percentile, up from 62; fifth grade, 65th percentile up from the 58th; sixth grade, 64th percentile, up from the 61st; seventh grade, 57th percentile, up from the 56th; eighth grade, 60th percentile, up from 59; ninth grade, 62nd, up from 58; 10th grade, 60th, up from 57 and 11th grade, 59th, down from 62.

Morgan County's scores were: third grade, 59th percentile, up from 52; fourth grade, 57th percentile, down from the 58th; fifth grade, 64th percentile, up from 57; sixth grade, 70th percentile, up from 64th; seventh grade, 60th percentile, up from 59th; eighth grade, 64th percentile, up from 55th; ninth grade, 50th percentile, up from 47th; tenth grade, 57th percentile, up from 50th and 11th grade, 54th percentile, down from the 58th.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|