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Letters to the Editor 6/3

June 02, 2000

Caring people are out there

To the editor:

On Saturday, May 13, I was walking back from the supermarket on Wilson Boulevard. It was very hot and humid I began to have difficulty walking so I had to stop several times, soaked all over with perspiration.

A red SUV stopped and the young lady asked me if I was OK. Her daughter Katie asked, "Mommy, is that lady all right?" The young lady said she would take me home wherever I lived. I only had about three blocks to my home but I finally said I would let them take me home as I really wasn't all right.

I do not know the young woman's name but she was absolutely wonderful. I cannot thank them enough for helping me; we were all strangers to each other.

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I feel that "Katie" was my guardian angel that day. Thanks again for stopping to help a stranger. I will be forever grateful as I was about to pass out from the heat and humidity. Yes, there are good, caring people in this troubled world.

A special thanks to Katie and her m,om.

Mary E. Waltrick

Hagerstown

Flower theft wasn't right

To the editor:

Death. A word so sad, filled with pain and suffering for all. Those who have never known such a loss cannot comprehend it. All we have left lies in the grave. To honor it, we place flowers. You will experience it sometime in your life also. Maybe then you will see that the small wooden basket filled with fuscia pansies that you stole on Easter day meant so much to me. You see, I have my grandmother, Mary Vantz, no more.

Only a place to honor her at Greenlawn Cemetery. She would have loved that basket of flowers on Easter if she were here. She would have loved you too. That's just how she was. If you would have asked, she would have given you that basket of flowers. May you enjoy that basket of flowers knowing that you acquired it through the death of a truly wonderful person. May you also think about the special bond my grandmother and myself shared and how that basket of flowers is all that I have left.

Candy Denkovich

Hagerstown

Forgive, but watch events unfold

To the editor:

In response to Ruth Brown's article, "President did seek forgiveness," on the 16th. David Woods was correct. He was not repentant. His so-called public confession on TV was not a show of true penitence. He came out swinging at his opponents, who, unlike him, were trying to uphold the Constitution and follow through on the rule of law. It is unfortunate that the Republicans behaved like fools, but that does not excuse behavior which, in the business world, the military, and among Rev. Wogaman's colleagues in the clergy would have resulted in being suspended, charged with sexual harassment, and loss of position and career.

Yes, Ms. Brown is correct. We must forgive him. Even though the President's so-called penitence was late in coming (after the polls and spin doctors convinced him he'd score more points with some humility), we still have to forgive him.

However, consequences are another story. Rev. Wogaman and countless others have confused forgiveness with cheap grace - that somehow, because we like a person, we should just move on and ignore the consequences of an unethical, immoral, and in fact an illegal act. Rev. Wogaman knows that if his church had a young intern, staff person, or even a member of the church, and he chose to use his pastoral office and influence to take advantage of her (whether she initiated it or not) he'd be up on charges and quite likely defrocked. Why? Because leaders are held to a higher standard. They influence and affect people's lives by their example and use of power. Though his colleagues would love him and forgive him and seek to counsel him, he would still deserve to lose the right to be a pastor. Likewise, the president of the greatest nation on earth should be held to a higher standard. How many children have been affected by President Clinton's moral example?

King David is a great example of one who was forgiven of a great sin, adultery with Bathsheba and the murder of her husband. Read on in your Bible and you will see the decline of his kingdom and the destruction of his family as the consequences. His sin set the stage for the sins of his son (King Solomon), which would eventually result in the destruction of the nation of Israel itself.

Forgive the president - yes, but watch the consequences as they unfold. They have already begun, and we have yet to see what the United States will become. Hopefully, we as a nation will be penitent and turn back to the Lord who, through the many faithful of past generations, built this country. God does not need the United States. The United States needs God.

Rev. Dennis E. Whitmore

Big Pool, Md.

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