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Placement of adult ad was not deliberate

April 17, 2000

Some of our readers were upset that an ad for an adult video store appeared on a religion page in Sunday's paper a couple of weeks ago. That was not deliberate.

It happened because editors here don't see the ads when we compose pages on our computers. All we see are empty boxes.

When the editor chose that page for religion copy, she was looking mainly for the amount of space she needed to run the Billy Graham column and the other weekly religion features.

Still, from now on, those kinds of ads will be carefully monitored by the advertising department and run only on entertainment pages.

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I've also gotten some questions recently about some of the polls we run, both in the paper and now on our Web site. One reader questioned the validity of such polls and he's right.

There's nothing scientific about them, but we've never pretended there was.

We run them mainly to give you a chance to add your two cents to various issues of the day. We hope they're a bit entertaining as well, especially the ones we just started on our Web site - www.herald-mail.com.

By the way, that poll is set up so one person can vote only one time. The computer locks them out after that.

In the paper, we occasionally ask readers to call in comments about certain issues. Once again, there's no science here, just a chance for you to express your opinion without having to leave your name. That's why we never total up those calls in a win/lose kind of way.

We've gotten a good response to the polls - two Web polls, one about the new Suns stadium and another about the Dual Highway cruisers - drew more than 500 votes each.

I think most of you enjoy them for what they are. I also believe you guys are smart enough to know the difference between these kinds of polls and something an organization like Gallup would do.




I found this quote from Thomas Jefferson on the side of a box of tea, of all places:

"I place economy among the first and most important virtues and public debt as the greatest of dangers to be feared. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt.

"If we run into such debts, we must be taxed in our meat and drink, in our necessities and in our comforts, in our labor and in our amusements. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labor of the people, under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy."




Gloria George is executive editor of The Herald-Mail.

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