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News | By MATTHEW UMSTEAD and matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | May 11, 2012
Nine years before Hall of Famer Lewis Robert “Hack” Wilson set the yet-to-be-broken Major League Baseball single-season record for runs batted in, he got his professional start in Martinsburg. Wilson, who is buried in Rosedale Cemetery in Martinsburg, started in 1921 as a catcher for the Mountaineers, the city's minor league team, according to historical accounts.  Wilson's success led to a major league career, which was highlighted by his 56-home run season in 1930 with the Chicago Cubs.
NEWS
by ARV VOSS/Motor Matters | July 15, 2005
Harley-Davidson has commemorated anniversaries before with special edition models, but I don't recall in recent history a specific model that celebrated its own anniversary. The Motor Company alters that history with the FLSTFI Fat Boy 15th Anniversary edition bike. Harley produced a limited number of Screamin' Eagle Fat Boys for the 2005 model year, but the 15th anniversary bike isn't a product of the Custom Vehicle Operation Screamin' Eagle lineup. Despite that fact, the 15th Anniversary Fat Boy is a limited edition bike that comes stock with a motor that's a full 100cc bigger - 1550cc to be exact.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | October 26, 2012
The array of solar panels all facing south give the appearance of a shimmering lake. And by late December, the 300,000 solar panels, each roughly the size of a 46-inch flat screen television near the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown off Roxbury Road, are expected to generate a peak of 20 megawatts of power per hour. The solar farm annually will produce enough electricity to power 4,000 to 5,000 single family homes, according to an estimate by an official at First Solar Inc., the company leasing the land from the state to run the plant.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 10, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com The wife of a man who died in 2001 after fencing materials fell on him has filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against the planing mill where the man was fatally injured. Max A. Fogle, who was 51, had gone to the Hicksville Planing Mill at 14464 Hicksville Road near Clear Spring early on July 3, 2001, to pick up several wooden fence sections, according to police accounts at the time. As Fogle, who lived in Hagerstown, was loading the fence sections into a truck, eight pieces that had been leaning against a wall fell on him, police said.
NEWS
December 28, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Truckers at the Travel Port truck stop in Greencastle showed little concern Tuesday over a Pennsylvania law that took effect last week making it illegal to stay in the left lane on major roads. The law forces drivers to use the lane "nearest the right-hand edge of the roadway," except to pass or to make a left turn - and then for only two miles before making the turn.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
NEWS
By ANGELICA ROBERTS | June 30, 2008
Editor's note: The following story about the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army Base is one in an occasional series of stories about some of the treasures of Washington County's past. CASCADE - What was to become Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base in Cascade started out as the Buena Vista Ice Co., became a National Guard camp and then was taken over by the U.S. Army to train soldiers in military intelligence and psychological warfare during World War II. It wound up its military years as a command center for Site R, a government installation known locally as the Underground Pentagon, built under Raven Rock Mountain in neighboring Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | July 20, 2011
As a dome of sweltering heat, dense humidity and bright sunlight pushes eastward, experts are urging everyone, not just those at high risk, to take precautions. "When you get all three together - heat, humidity and sun - it makes the trifecta, and it really increases your chances of getting ill," according to Stacey Talbert, a registered nurse at Meritus Medical Center emergency department. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene activated its heat emergency plan this week, warning localities and residents to prepare.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
Poinsettias were introduced into the United States almost 200 years ago by Joel Poinsett, the first U.S. Ambassador to Mexico. They were given the common name poinsettia in his honor.   Over time, poinsettias have become the best-selling flowering potted plants in the U.S.  They are tidy attractive plants with clusters of several colored leaves, or bracts. Bracts are typically red, pink or cream and are often mistaken as part of the flower. However, actual poinsettia flowers are small and yellowish green; they are located within the bract clusters.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | April 11, 2009
Q: We moved into this home a couple of years ago, and it had several flowering vines growing on a variety of trellises. Some are falling apart and need to be replaced. I would like to cut some of the vines down, rebuild the trellises and let them grow back. I am afraid the vines will die or, if they survive, will not climb up the trellis. Is it OK to do this now, while they are dormant? How do I attach them to the trellis? A: Climbing vines want to go up. There are several methods that they use to attach themselves to vertical objects.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 11, 2000
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A man and woman who suspected their spouses were having an extramarital affair were charged Tuesday with plotting the death of the woman's husband, who disappeared 15 years ago, Pennsylvania State Police said. cont. from front page Ronald West Harshman, 51, of 11807 Clearview Road, Hagerstown, and Joan Snyder Hall, 56, of 12850 Grant Shook Road, Greencastle, were both charged with criminal homicide and criminal conspiracy in the death of Melvin E. Snyder, who was last seen May 25, 1985.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
The rest stop off Interstate 70 near Myersville, Md., has been renovated since two of this century's most notorious serial killers were captured there 10 years ago Wednesday. Retired Maryland State Trooper 1st Class D. Wayne Smith said the parking area is bigger and larger buildings have been constructed to replace the former welcome center. Despite the changes, Smith said he remembers where the Chevrolet Caprice with New Jersey tags was parked. The car was used by Beltway snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, whose shooting spree terrorized the Washington, D.C., area for 21 days in 2002.
BREAKINGNEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | March 3, 2011
Christopher T. Jones was sentenced Thursday in Franklin County (Pa.) Court to a minimum of six years in state prison for the Feb. 25, 2010, shooting death of his wife in their St. Thomas Township, Pa., home. In January, Jones, 31, entered a guilty plea to voluntary manslaughter before Judge Shawn D. Meyers. Jones shot his wife, Kristin Runyon, but said he thought she was an intruder in the 5 a.m. darkness. In their statements to the judge, her family argued Jones was angered that his wife of one year wanted a divorce.
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