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News | April 21, 2010
Compact fluorescent light bulbs Pros Uses less energy than incandescent bulbs, reducing demand for electricity and amount of mercury emitted from power plants. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will use 75 percent less energy than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will last about 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will pay for itself in about 6 months. Cons Disposal isn't convenient because bulbs contain mercury.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | June 20, 2006
McCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - A man who pleaded guilty to the March 1995 murder of his wife has been sentenced to eight to 14 years in a state prison, Fulton County (Pa.) District Attorney Dwight Harvey said Monday. Judge Carol Van Horn in the Fulton County Court of Common Pleas last week sentenced Stephen Alfred Vanderbeek in accordance with a plea agreement and sentencing guidelines for the third-degree murder and abuse-of-a-corpse charges Vanderbeek faced, Harvey said. The judge also told Vanderbeek she would stay informed of any of his requests for parole, which could begin in seven years, Harvey said.
NEWS
BY RICHARD F. BELISLE | May 8, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, Pa. - When a soil compactor rolled over Brian G. Samick in a landfill accident Monday morning it not only crushed out the life of the young surveyor, it left his wife without a husband and his two little girls without a father. Samick, 34, of 2746 Hoffman Road in Greencastle, was pronounced dead at the Mountain View Reclamation landfill on Letzburg Road, Upton, Pa., around 9:30 a.m. Monday by Kenneth L. Peiffer Jr., deputy Franklin County coroner.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | July 10, 2012
Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series on children eating vegetables. The series explores ways to highlight a vegetable's flavor and appearance as a way to work around the resistance some picky eaters have to trying unfamiliar vegetables. I am OK with radishes. Really, I am. They have a peppery bite, a bright color and a pleasant crunch. But I've never really taken them seriously on their own. They always seemed like a side show - a garnish - to a salad or some other important dish.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | September 11, 2012
Everyone comes for Civil War battle re-enactments - the smoke, the noise, the advancing lines of men and horses. But who stays for dinner after the battle? As spectators dribbled out of the grounds after Saturday's  "Maryland, My Maryland" re-enactment of the Battle of South Mountain, Sharon Jackson poked the fire at the 27th Virginia Company C encampment. Jackson is from Pennsylvania, but she's with the 4th Texas Company B. But on Saturday, her unit was on campaign, so she was adopted as a cook by the 27th Virginia.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2011
City of Hagerstown employees will make an average of $54,222 in the current fiscal year, or $17,770 more than Washington County's estimated average annual income. • LINK: City of Hagerstown salary database   The average annual wage per worker in Washington County was listed at $36,452. That figure is based on the latest average weekly wage per worker of $701 from the third quarter of 2010, according to figures provided by the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | June 21, 2000
After hearing appeals from a convicted murderer and his family, Washington County Circuit Judge Frederick Wright Wednesday denied requests to reduce the 30-year sentence Timothy Lorne Massie is serving for choking and stabbing his wife to death on Valentine's Day five years ago. cont. from front page Wright said he felt the sentence imposed for a second-degree murder conviction was appropriate. "I see no reason to modify or change" the sentence, Wright said. Massie's mother, Virginia Massie, said her son hadn't gotten into trouble growing up and was a benefit to the community.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
Wendy Kidd was working inside a client's home, cleaning the master bathroom when, suddenly, she heard a noise in the bedroom. Peeking around a corner, Kidd gasped when she saw a man - the husband in the family that owned the house - beginning to undress. “I said, 'What are you doing?!!'” Kidd remembers screaming. As it turned out, the man hadn't known she was there, and he was just changing his clothes. “I don't know who was more embarrassed - him or I,” Kidd said.
NEWS
by ARV VOSS/Motor Matters | July 15, 2005
Harley-Davidson has commemorated anniversaries before with special edition models, but I don't recall in recent history a specific model that celebrated its own anniversary. The Motor Company alters that history with the FLSTFI Fat Boy 15th Anniversary edition bike. Harley produced a limited number of Screamin' Eagle Fat Boys for the 2005 model year, but the 15th anniversary bike isn't a product of the Custom Vehicle Operation Screamin' Eagle lineup. Despite that fact, the 15th Anniversary Fat Boy is a limited edition bike that comes stock with a motor that's a full 100cc bigger - 1550cc to be exact.
NEWS
By ANGELICA ROBERTS | June 30, 2008
Editor's note: The following story about the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army Base is one in an occasional series of stories about some of the treasures of Washington County's past. CASCADE - What was to become Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base in Cascade started out as the Buena Vista Ice Co., became a National Guard camp and then was taken over by the U.S. Army to train soldiers in military intelligence and psychological warfare during World War II. It wound up its military years as a command center for Site R, a government installation known locally as the Underground Pentagon, built under Raven Rock Mountain in neighboring Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | April 11, 2009
Q: We moved into this home a couple of years ago, and it had several flowering vines growing on a variety of trellises. Some are falling apart and need to be replaced. I would like to cut some of the vines down, rebuild the trellises and let them grow back. I am afraid the vines will die or, if they survive, will not climb up the trellis. Is it OK to do this now, while they are dormant? How do I attach them to the trellis? A: Climbing vines want to go up. There are several methods that they use to attach themselves to vertical objects.
NEWS
December 28, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Truckers at the Travel Port truck stop in Greencastle showed little concern Tuesday over a Pennsylvania law that took effect last week making it illegal to stay in the left lane on major roads. The law forces drivers to use the lane "nearest the right-hand edge of the roadway," except to pass or to make a left turn - and then for only two miles before making the turn.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2012
A fight filmed on the steps of the historic Berkeley County Courthouse played out on televisions across the country Sunday night as part of TLC's “My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding.” Two young Romanichal gypsy women shoved and punched each other following a wedding in the reality series that depicts the everyday lives of families like Mellie Stanley's. She was charged with disorderly conduct after the brawl. Cameras caught Mellie and the maid of honor, Diamond, in what Mellie called “a huge argument.” It centered around comments allegedly made about the bride's mother-in-law.
NEWS
By Lynn F. Little | April 15, 1997
Number 10: Safe food handling practices are the ones most likely to preserve food's top quality. Keeping hot foods hot and cold foods cold inhibits growth of the microorganisms that can spoil your food or make you ill. Storage at the proper temperature retains the fresh appearance, pleasant aroma, and agreeable texture that contribute to an enjoyable dining experience. Number nine: Safe food handling lets you obtain the full nutritional benefits from the food you have chosen.
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