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What the FDA does, doesn't regulate

November 30, 1999|By KRISTIN WILSON

One of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's jobs is to regulate new drugs for humans and animals, biological products, medical devices, food and color additives, infant formulas, cosmetics and products that emit radiation.

The FDA does not regulate advertising, alcohol, consumer products, illegal drugs, meat and poultry, pesticides or restaurants.

When it approves a product, the FDA must make sure that the item will be safe and effective. That's because FDA approval greenlights products for sale.

To be approved, the FDA reviews the results of laboratory, animal and human research tests performed by the companies applying for approval. FDA employees look at the studies to determine if the product is safe and effective, but the FDA does not develop or test products itself, according to information on the agency's Web site, www.fda.gov.

The FDA does inspect drug manufacturing sites and establishes "good manufacturing practices," says an FDA spokeswoman.

To check out the latest product approvals, go to the Web site and click on "Product Approvals."

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