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Blast from the Past

March 24, 1999

Week of March 21, 1949

Shenandoah Gas Co. was granted a charter yesterday by the Virginia State Corporation Commission, giving the company approval to build a 26-inch pipeline from Front Royal, Va., to other points in Virginia, through Charles Town, Harpers Ferry, Martinsburg and Shepherdstown, W.Va., and to Hagerstown. The company will supply Hagerstown and other communities along the route with wholesale and retail natural and manufactured gas.




Hagerstown voters yesterday gave overwhelming approval to the new "home rule" city charter. The new charter paves the way for a joint city-county election system and changes the boundaries of the five city election wards. For the first time since the 1800s, the new charter gathers all basic city laws in one document.




A woman photographer hurled a bowl of bean soup smack into the face of Daily Mail columnist Tris Coffin at lunchtime yesterday in the U.S. Senate dining room. The soup was hurled by Marion Carpenter as her objection to an item in Coffin's column stating that she "teased and smiled" Senator McKellar to pose for a photograph he liked well enough to order in large quantities. Coffin said he didn't know why Carpenter threw the soup "unless it was to get more publicity."

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Week of March 21, 1974

The Boonsboro Planning Commission is taking steps to make Boonsboro as "self-sufficient" as possible. The seven-member commission has proposed zoning plans for a new industrial park, a recreation center and park, and a trade center.




About 40 residents of the Tammany-Van Lear area have given the Washington County Sanitary Commission a petition opposing construction of a sanitary sewer system there. What makes this proposal extraordinary is that some of the 61 residents who signed another petition asking the sewer agency for such a system, now oppose its construction.




Roadway Express, the nation's largest trucking company, will build a $1 million terminal on a 39-acre site west of Funkstown. The company eventually will employ approximately 350 people and will be the largest of its type in Washington County.

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