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Letters to the Editor

January 21, 1999

The absurdity of it all

To the editor:

The decorum of the Senate requires, the American people deserve, justice demands, due process and fairness to our forefathers who in their wisdom. . .bipartisan confusion reigns as the gavel falls and the trial opens and closes while the Senators scurry around to get before TV cameras and their aides read the poll results to them and "he" (to be fair I'm not using proper names here except for Larry Flynt) goes about the nation's business leading us into the 21st Century where love apparently means sex and daughters send semen stained dresses to their mothers for safekeeping, and girlfriends tape their telephone rambling chit chat which, as all special prosecutors know, must be the truth because Monica didn't know she was being taped in violation of Maryland law until the FBI overrode our statutes.

(Stylistic note: Yes, I've been rereading Kerouac.)

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So the solons meet and emerge from their seclusion to claim a victory, Trent Lott (I was just kidding about not using names.) waving the paper in the air reminding me of Chamberlain returning to England from his meeting with Hitler waving the document Adolf signed giving us "Peace in our time." (You young folk might not remember that.)

This historic paper, as Candy Curley of CNN rightly called it, agrees to what both sides had already agreed to and puts off what they continue to disagree about. But it was all done in the spirit of bipartisanship, a 14 letter word which describes the Titanic when it reared up and split in two before plunging down into the bottom of the ocean.

Meanwhile every TV channel, it seemed, was interviewing a senator while Strom Thurmond was being helped off the dias and The Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court was suffering through another vote to postpone the trial for another week. Our own Senator Sarbanes was on Channel 9, in what seemed to be a daze, struggling to describe what happened, being prompted by anchorman Gordon Petersen who is not, as has been rumored, an ex-nun.

It's Sunday as I write this and I'm going to the TV for the football playoffs as soon as I get it into the envelope because I've never heard a game announcer use the term "Amerrican People." So I leave you now as Jim Lehrer is lining up next week's stories for PBS, probably negotiating to interview fifth graders on how they describe Monica and Bill's goings on to their grandparents.

Bill Moulden

Frederick, Md.

Republic or not, we still vote

To the editor:

With regard to Donald Currier's statement that the United States is a republic rather than a democracy - that may be so, Mr. Currier, but for one day in November 2000 it will be a democracy, and hopefully will continue so thereafter. I hear Republicans are changing affiliation in record numbers.

Valerie Stine

Hagerstown

The other side

To the editor:

This letter is in defense of Bart Sword, manager of Rod's, the Beanie Store in Valley Mall. First, let me start by saying that this man is among the fairest of any Beanie Store owner. We have been patronizing his store for Beanies for over a year now. We know this man is nowhere close to being a Scrooge.

If you have 12-year-olds who leave a store crying and all upset because they couldn't have what they wanted, then maybe someone hasn't been the perfect parent in raising the little darlings.

So, before you pass judgment on a man you don't even know, maybe you should teach these little children they can't always get what they want, and life isn't fair a lot of times. It's people like you who use kids as an excuse to be able to get three, four or five at a time. I've seen people drag kids that don't even belong to them to stores just to buy a lot in one day. So personally, I think his policy of not selling to kids under 12 years old is wonderful.

He only enforces this when there has been a long line for brand new releases. This is a whole different side to this story.

L. Long

Hagerstown

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