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Craft show draws crowd in Pa.

November 28, 1998|By LAURA ERNDE

FAYETTEVILLE, Pa. - For one day a year, Kathy Cubbage of Fayetteville brings out the dozens of fanciful dolls that she has worked on all year and puts them up for sale.

"I gotta say goodbye to all my dolls," Cubbage said as she bagged one named "Blossom" on Saturday for Sara Gilbert, 60, of Shippensburg, Pa.

Cubbage's hand-sewn dolls have painted on faces and are dressed in colorful plaid and flower prints. "Whimsical Whimseys" is the name of her collection.

"I like to play with dolls. They make me laugh and they make other people laugh," she said.

Her South Miami Beach dolls resemble retired ladies headed for sunbathing, wearing jewelry and carrying bags. Her fairies have colorful beaded wings and sit on hand-sewn mushrooms.

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Cubbage sold about half of her dolls Saturday at the annual Christmas Crafts Market sponsored by Cumberland Valley Craftsmen of Chambersburg, Pa.

The organization sponsors two major craft shows a year, including this one the Saturday after Thanksgiving.

Traditionally, it's been held at Wilson College. This year, the show was moved to the Fayetteville Community Center because of more convenient parking and more modern facilities, organizers said.

Attendance had been dropping the last four or five years, but this year it bounced back, said Gary Geiman, co-chairman.

By mid-afternoon, more than 1,200 people had come for a free look at some of the area's best crafts.

There was a variety of crafts, including handcrafted wood carvings, jewelry, baskets and teddy bears.

Maureen Wang, 34, visited while she was home for the holidays because there's nothing like it in Miami, where she lives now.

Pat Humpleby, 61, of North Guilford Hills, Pa., said she prefers craft shows over shopping malls. She enjoys talking to the artists about their work.

"I usually find some Christmas things," she said.

Almost everyone who visits Cubbage's booth comments about her hat, adorned with tiny dolls she has collected from other doll makers.

Cubbage, a former substitute teacher in Chambersburg, got serious about her hobby about four years ago.

She goes to doll making shows and belongs to dollmaking clubs. She doesn't go on the road to craft shows like some crafts people.

For the amount of time she puts into the dolls, she doesn't make much money. But she wants to keep her prices affordable so people will buy them and enjoy them, she said.

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