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W.Va. man making name for himself in music world

November 08, 1998

Danny FairclothBy DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town

photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer




MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Danny Faircloth remembers when he started out in the music business, performing songs from hard rockers like Bad Company and Judas Priest.

It wasn't his calling, but it turned out to be a valuable experience for Faircloth, 44.

He began writing and singing his own songs, and the music industry responded.

--cont. from news page--

HillTop Records in Hollywood, Calif., recently used one of Faircloth's new songs in a compilation called "America."

HillTop Records wants to use another Faircloth song in one of its projects, and the Berkeley County native just finished "Single Mind," a cassette tape of seven original songs that he produced himself.

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Faircloth said he began writing and singing his own material about eight years ago. At times playing with his own band, Living Daylights, Faircloth played at private parties and a few bars, and people liked the sound.

His collection includes love songs and tunes about growing up in West Virginia, such as "Big City Free."

"I think he's done a great job," said friend Tim Foster of Gerrardstown, W.Va. Foster said Faircloth played at his Halloween party and about 50 people came to hear him sing.

"It's different music, but people like it," said Foster.

"It's like a modern country," said Jeff Fellers, another friend of Faircloth's who has worked in the music business.

The "America" cassette produced by HillTop includes songs from several artists, said Faircloth. His contribution to the tape, a love song called "Send Me," is sung by another performer.

That doesn't bother him.

"It doesn't make any difference who does your music, as long as it's out there," said Faircloth.

Faircloth said he will probably never live anywhere else but Berkeley County. But to survive, he said his music has to reach outside the state.

Faircloth said he competed in a regional competition in June for the "Star Search" television show in Hagerstown and won second place. He met music producer Bruce Goodwin as a result of the performance, which he hopes will lead to more success in national music circles.

In the meantime, Faircloth said he will be doing his best to spread his music through the local area. He said he plans to distribute his "Single Mind" tape to local radio stations, hoping they will air takes from it.

"I'm a better songwriter than I am a singer, but 'Single Mind' proves a lot," said Faircloth.

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