Advertisement

Walkers take steps for needy

October 18, 1998

 

By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town

photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer




MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - If anyone could appreciate Sunday's CROP Walk against world hunger, it was Michael Frick.

Frick said when he was growing up, his mother was married to a man who gambled his money away. As a result, Frick sometimes had to depend on the Salvation Army to get food.

--cont. from news page--

On Sunday, Frick joined 46 other people to raise money for other hungry people in the world. The annual Christian Rural Outreach Program walk against world hunger raised $2,065, which will be used both abroad and locally to feed people.

Advertisement

"I feel like I'm giving back," Frick said as he walked with the others through a neighborhood on Burke Street in Martinsburg. "There are people in the world less fortunate than we are. Why not help?" said the Bunker Hill, W.Va., resident.

The 5K walk, which started at War Memorial Park and looped through downtown Martinsburg, raised more than the $1,800 collected last year, even though there were fewer walkers. About 100 participated last year.

Organizers said more money was raised because pledges were higher this year.

Most of the money goes to Church World Service, which provides food, health supplies and blankets to the needy worldwide.

Twenty-five percent of the funds go to the Community Christian Action Project, an assistance program for the needy that is based in the First Presbyterian Church on Queen Street in Martinsburg.

The Community Christian Action Project offers assistance with rent payments, utility bills and food, said Eddie Edmonds, pastor of the Moler Avenue Church of the Brethren. Local lawyers also donate their time to help people with basic legal questions, said Edmonds.

The project assists between 275 and 350 people monthly, Edmonds said.

Edmonds said interest has dropped in the CROP Walk in recent years in Martinsburg, but he wants to generate more participation in the event.

Past walks generated up to $4,500, officials said.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|