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Calm settles after storm

March 23, 1998

Calm settles after storm

A couple of snow flurries was all that Mother Nature could muster Sunday and most Tri-State residents were happy for the chance to dry out.

Exhausted from calls for flooded basements, flooded roads and a couple of water rescues, emergency crews enjoyed a rather uneventful day.

Funkstown, Civil Defense and Community Rescue Service were the exception, called out at 11:53 a.m. Sunday for two boaters who capsized in the swollen Antietam Creek off Garis Shop Road.

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The two boaters managed to get themselves out without injury and without much help, would-be rescuers said.

In Berkeley County, W.Va., two cars were found abandoned in high water Sunday. One was on Berkeley Station Road and the other on Grapevine Road, a spokesman at the 911 center said.

Only three roads in Franklin County, Pa., were still closed Sunday evening - Old Scotland Road at Pine Stump, Loop Road and Pine Stump Road, emergency personnel said.

At the height of the weekend storm, more than a dozen roads in Pennsylvania were affected by high water.

Roads that were still reported with high water on Sunday in Washington County were Antietam Drive from Md. 64 to Security Road; Battletown Road; Beaver Creek Road; Burnside Bridge Road; Dogstreet Road; Lehmans Mill Road; Leiters Mill Road; Mills Road; Md. 68 west of Md. 632; Mount Briar Road; Old Forge Road and Clopper Road; Old Roxbury Road off U.S. Alt. 40; Spielman Road west of Md. 632; Warner Hollow Road; and Wishard Road.

With Friday and Saturday's sometimes torrential rainfall, the total for the month of March soared to 5.86 inches, according to Greg Keefer, Hagerstown weather observer.

The Potomac River didn't take the surge in precipitation lightly either, rising to near bank levels at several Washington County locations.

The Potomac in Hancock and Williamsport in Maryland and Paw Paw, Harpers Ferry and Shepherdstown in West Virginia, were all still wild but receding, said National Weather Service hydrologist Jim DeCarufel.

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