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Letterkenny plans closings

March 03, 1998|By DON AINES

Letterkenny plans closings

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Public recycling at Letterkenny Army Depot will end May 10 and golf could face a similar fate by the end of the year as a result of the continuing downsizing of the depot.

The borough of Chambersburg, St. Thomas Township, depot employees and members of the public have been bringing cans, bottles and other recyclable materials to the depot for years. Lisa Byers, real estate coordinator for the Letterkenny Industrial Development Authority, said Monday that's one of several activities the Army will cut back on in the next year.

"The depot will still recycle internally," depot spokesman Alan Loessy said. The cutbacks in depot operations and personnel make it impractical to keep accepting materials from the public.

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The last rounds at the nine-hole Rocky Springs Golf Course could be played by December, according to Byers. The course is on land that will be turned over to the development authority in the future and private management of the course is not out of the question, according to Executive Director Pam Gaudiose.

There are some liability issues, she said.

One is that the course plays across roads that eventually will become public. Board member John Redding said a golfer has to cross a road half a dozen times during a nine-hole round "if you hit the ball straight."

The Army will close the swimming pool and outdoor recreation equipment rental and travel camp in September, Byers said. In December, the gymnasium, community club and golf course will shut down.

Byers said the Army will close its day-care center, school-age child services and the depot's guest house in March 1999.

Byers said a group of area churches is negotiating for use of the gym and depot chapel. Gaudiose said the day-care center and other services could be taken over by private companies.

Loessy said between 60 and 65 people work in the various activities and services, a number that fluctuates seasonally. He said few are permanent employees. Most are part-time, seasonal, on-call and temporary workers.

"They've all been told of the schedule," he said.

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