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New cereal is a winner in the crunch

January 09, 1998

By DAVE McMILLION

Staff Writer

CLEAR SPRING - Local agriculture students routinely compete in national Future Farmers of America contests, but Heidi Drury made Washington County history when she tied for first place in one of the events.

Drury, 17, part of a team of Clear Spring High School students who competed in the contest in Kansas City in November, received top recognition for developing a new breakfast cereal.

It was the first time a Washington County student has scored that high in the national contest, and the first time in about 15 years that a student from Maryland has scored that high, said Terrie Shank, agriculture instructor and FFA adviser at Clear Spring High.

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Drury and her teammates had an hour to put together ingredients for a new cereal and to design a box for it. As part of the process, the team had to determine nutritional information about the product, including fat content.

Drury tied for first place in the food science and technology category for her work on "Right Choice," a combination of dates, raisins, granola and bran flakes. The team that Drury was on placed third for its work on the same product when the individual category scores were all compiled.

During the competition, team members were scored individually based on a series of scores they received in the competition.

There were 16 teams, each of which had four members, officials said. "They crushed. They really did good," said Clear Spring High School student Brian Stottlemyer, who competed in another category.

Other students on Drury's team included Lauren Moffaitt, Lindsay Mills and Karla Wright.

Teams that compete nationally must first win regional and state competitions, students said.

Another Clear Spring team competing in the forestry division finished 21st out of about 46 teams, and a farm business management team placed 36 out of about 43 teams, students said.

About 80 students from across the country competed in the contest Nov. 11-15 at the H. Roe Bartlett Hall and Convention Center in Kansas City.

In addition to placing No. 1 in the contest, Drury managed to work in a little industry history.

Her bran flakes and granola cereal needed a mascot, so she put the familiar Kellogg's rooster on the front of her box, showing the bird cradling a bowl of the new stuff.

She told contest officials that the bird had a name - "Cornelius Rooster."

"One of them was the Kellogg's representative. That was fun," said Drury.

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