Advertisement

To some, these principles are not to be taken lightly

July 19, 1997

Is it hocus-pocus? Some people might think so, but others believe in the power of placement to affect the lives of the people who occupy the space.

Donald Trump consulted with feng shui practitioners before constructing his latest building, according to Pat Nickels, a resident of Waynesboro, Pa., who has applied feng shui principles in her home, the homes of friends and acquaintances, even a health-food store.

Dan Borzager and his sister, Sue Stempien, own Natural Alternatives and Energy in Waynesboro, Pa. The big room in an old building on Walnut Street stocks a variety of natural foods and products and is the third site for the four-and-a-half-year-old enterprise which also offers four kinds of massage, a sauna and nutritional counseling.

The store's name indicates that its owners might accept nontraditional approaches, and they indeed were open to Nickels and feng shui. She made several recommendations, and Borzager and Stempien adopted them: The walls were painted a deep blue to bring wealth; shelves at the right and left rear were placed catty-corner to soften the energy flow; a mirror was placed near the cash register to reflect energy to the wealth corner; a mirror was put outside the entrance to reflect negative energy away from the store, and wind chimes and crystals were hung to help break up the energy flow in broad open spaces. The wind chimes double as a burglar alarm, Borzager jokes.

Advertisement

Business has increased 20 to 25 percent since the feng shui adjustment, Borzager says. He's not superstitious, but it works, he adds.

Borzager even went so far as to call a Baltimore radio talk show when disc jockeys were making fun of feng shui. He later accompanied Nickels to the broadcast station for an on-air defense.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|