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Front-end loader slams through family's garage

May 13, 1997

By BRENDAN KIRBY

and KERRY LYNN FRALEY

Staff Writers

A Washington County man was taken to the hospital Monday night after a front-end loader he was driving crashed into a garage behind his family's house at 136 Hump Road, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Department.

Blake W. "Buddy" Durboraw, 26, was taken to Washington County Hospital shortly after the 9:20 p.m. incident, deputies said.

The garage contained a race car that Durboraw told authorities was jointly owned by him and his father, William L. Durboraw Sr., 56, deputies said.

Authorities estimated damage to the garage and its contents, including the race car, at $40,000.

Deputies discovered the damaged garage when they were called to Hump Road for a disturbance.

Deputies said they saw two people, who later were identified as Blake Durboraw and his brother Marvin Earl Durboraw, 32, also of 136 Hump Road, fighting in the driveway of the home.

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There had been an earlier disagreement between Blake Durboraw and his father, and Blake Durboraw left the house, Deputy Tom Routzahn said.

On the way to his former girlfriend's house, he drove into a dump truck on Ross Street, deputies said.

He told authorities that he rode a bicycle to a gas station on West Washington Street, where he got a ride back to the Hump Road house, Routzahn said.

Afterward, a front-end loader owned by Craig Paving Inc., also of Hump Road, was driven through the garage, deputies said.

A representative from the company told deputies that the equipment was valued at $250,000, authorities said.

In addition to the race car, the garage contained cylinders of special gas, which authorities feared were punctured when the building collapsed, deputies said.

A hazardous materials unit was called in to investigate, deputies said. Joseph Kroboth III, chief of the Volunteer Fire Co. at Halfway, said officials took precautions because of the potential danger.

"It's extremely flammable, easily ignitable," Kroboth said. "The vapors can cause asphyxiation. It's a pretty serious material."

A hospital spokeswoman said early Tuesday that Durboraw was being evaluated in the emergency room.

No charges had been filed as of early Tuesday, deputies said.

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