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News | By KATE S. ALEXANDER and kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | July 20, 2011
As a dome of sweltering heat, dense humidity and bright sunlight pushes eastward, experts are urging everyone, not just those at high risk, to take precautions. "When you get all three together - heat, humidity and sun - it makes the trifecta, and it really increases your chances of getting ill," according to Stacey Talbert, a registered nurse at Meritus Medical Center emergency department. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene activated its heat emergency plan this week, warning localities and residents to prepare.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 26, 2011
It's a bit like boot camp for bosses. A chief executive officer leaves the lap of luxury, takes on a secret identity and attempts to do the job of his employees. And, usually, doesn't do it very well. It's a working-class fantasy that is turned into reality each week on the hit CBS television show, "Undercover Boss. " The executives are humbled and the employees selected to train them become labor force heroes — maybe even celebrities. Mack Trucks Inc. employees Tracy Sweatt and Michael J. Davies might not put themselves in that category, but since appearing on the show, both said they've gotten a taste of star treatment.
NEWS
By ANGELICA ROBERTS | June 30, 2008
Editor's note: The following story about the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army Base is one in an occasional series of stories about some of the treasures of Washington County's past. CASCADE - What was to become Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base in Cascade started out as the Buena Vista Ice Co., became a National Guard camp and then was taken over by the U.S. Army to train soldiers in military intelligence and psychological warfare during World War II. It wound up its military years as a command center for Site R, a government installation known locally as the Underground Pentagon, built under Raven Rock Mountain in neighboring Pennsylvania.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | September 30, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - After setting up an easel in front of a 12-person jury Wednesday morning, defense attorney Craig Manford reached into his jacket pocket, pulled out a set of keys, handed them to his legal assistant and asked his assistant to hold them. "Was that delivery?" Manford then asked jurors during his opening statement in the felony murder trial of Nicole Kees. The definition of what constitutes delivery of a controlled substance is a major part of the case against Kees, 21, who is charged with felony murder in connection with the death of Jashua E. Frocke, 18. Frocke's body was found inside a Martinsburg motel room on Jan. 13. Kees' trial began Wednesday and is expected to resume today.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
What are the regulations in Maryland for obtaining historic tags for your car or truck? Once you get the historic registration, are there restrictions for how you are allowed to use the vehicle? The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration website at www.mva.maryland.gov provides the following information about historic registration: To qualify for historic registration, your vehicle must not have been substantially altered, remodeled or remanufactured from its original design; must be a passenger vehicle, motorcycle or truck (with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less)
NEWS
December 28, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Truckers at the Travel Port truck stop in Greencastle showed little concern Tuesday over a Pennsylvania law that took effect last week making it illegal to stay in the left lane on major roads. The law forces drivers to use the lane "nearest the right-hand edge of the roadway," except to pass or to make a left turn - and then for only two miles before making the turn.
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