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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | By DAN DEARTH and dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | February 25, 2011
A Hagerstown soldier accused of killing an unarmed Afghan civilian last September was an exemplary leader who showed solid judgment and looked out for his men, an eyewitness to the incident told Army officials in military proceedings. Spc. Charles Miller testified during an Article 32 hearing, which is similar to a civilian grand jury, that Sgt. Derrick Miller, 27, was a "squared away" soldier who acted "reasonably in pressure situations. " "I wouldn't question his judgment if he believed the use of deadly force was necessary," Charles Miller said.
NEWS
by JASON STEIN / Wheelbase Communications | July 16, 2006
Sometimes, she says, when times are tough and she's feeling lonely, she still cries. It might last 10 seconds. It might last longer. But deep down, Teresa Earnhardt, auto racing's most famous widow and one of NASCAR's most influential team owners, knows that the pain will never go away. "I hate it," Teresa Earnhardt once told NBC's Dateline news program. "I hate it so bad, feeling bad, that I just turn it off. I miss him and I always will. Just terribly. But I'm not going to feel bad about it. I'm going to feel glad about what I had. " What she had was, in a word, everything.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
What are the regulations in Maryland for obtaining historic tags for your car or truck? Once you get the historic registration, are there restrictions for how you are allowed to use the vehicle? The Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration website at www.mva.maryland.gov provides the following information about historic registration: To qualify for historic registration, your vehicle must not have been substantially altered, remodeled or remanufactured from its original design; must be a passenger vehicle, motorcycle or truck (with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less)
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | May 12, 2013
It began with piece of junk mail. Because you were busy, you tossed it on a table, and moved on to other, more important things in your life. But the next day, a magazine and a store catalog landed there, plus several birthday cards from friends and a week's worth of newspapers. Every time you passed by, you considered sorting through the items and discarding what you didn't need. Instead, you continued adding to the pile, telling yourself you'd get around to straightening things up as soon as you had some free time.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | July 6, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Lt. K.C. Bohrer, a 25-year veteran of the Berkeley County Sheriff's Department, started to tell a story about a case one of his co-workers is handling that involves heroin. Before he could delve into the details the co-worker, Sgt. Gary Harmison, interrupted him. "It all relates to heroin," Harmison said, stressing the word "all. " Bohrer, Harmison and Sgt. Russell Shackelford, members of the Sheriff's Department's Criminal Investigation Division, said that lately at least half of their time is spent working on cases related to heroin, which they said is becoming the drug of choice in the county.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | May 28, 2011
Hundreds came out Saturday to honor the memory of U.S. Army Master Sgt. Benjamin Franklin Bitner at a memorial service at Rescue Hose Co. No. 1. Bitner, 37, a native of Greencastle, was killed April 23 in Afghanistan by an improvised explosive device. As the song "Story of My Life" played in the background, clips of Bitner passed in front of the eyes of more than 400 family members, friends and community members who attended the service. For those who knew him or wanted to know him better, the video helped the crowd honor Bitner's memory on a more personal level.
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